Articles

Understanding Hyponatraemia

Understanding Hyponatraemia

Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte disorder encountered in clinical practice and is seen in approximately 30% of hospitalised patients. It is also one of the most poorly understood and difficult to manage scenarios in medicine. It is rarely dangerous, but on...

read more
The Acute Red Eye

The Acute Red Eye

The acute red eye is a common presentation in the primary care setting. Most cases are benign in nature, with conjunctivitis being the most common aetiology. There are; however, several serious pathologies that clinicians need to be aware of that require urgent...

read more
Arterial Line Placement

Arterial Line Placement

Arterial line placement is a very common procedure in critical care and emergency medicine settings. The most common indications are: Haemodynamic instability requiring continuous direct BP monitoring Titration of vasopressors (or other cardioactive drugs) Need for...

read more
The Dancing Plague of 1518

The Dancing Plague of 1518

In the summer of 1518 in the city of Strasbourg, Alsace, a woman by the name of Frau Troffea took to the streets and started to dance. She continued to dance day and night without stopping. No one knows why she started but within a few days others started to join in....

read more
Platelets as a Cancer Marker

Platelets as a Cancer Marker

A large, population-based study published in 2017 in the British Journal of General Practice has led to the emergence of raised platelet levels as a risk marker of cancer. The study showed that 12% of men and 6% of women with thrombocytosis were diagnosed with cancer...

read more
What is Eosinophilic Oesophagitis?

What is Eosinophilic Oesophagitis?

Eosinophilic oesophagitis, which is sometimes abbreviated to EoE in American publications, is an allergic inflammatory condition of the oesophagus that involves eosinophils. It was first discovered as a clinical entity around 20 years ago but has only recently become...

read more
What’s New in Trauma? (ATLS 10th Edition Updates)

What’s New in Trauma? (ATLS 10th Edition Updates)

The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program was introduced in the 1980s to address the need for higher-quality trauma care, particularly in the “first hour” after injury, following an incident in which an orthopaedic surgeon crashed his plane in a rural setting....

read more
Survival Tips for Night Shifts

Survival Tips for Night Shifts

In the 14 years or so that I worked regular night shifts in the Emergency Department, I’m not sure I can honestly say that I ever fully adapted to them. It is well recognised that there is an increased risk of poor decision-making and errors at night, and it is,...

read more
Exchange Opportunities for Medical Students

Exchange Opportunities for Medical Students

As they navigate through Medical School, students are exposed to a varying number of opportunities, and among them gentle invitations to explore the medical perspectives of other nations. From in-class interactions with their colleagues from different parts of the...

read more
The Management of Sore Throat

The Management of Sore Throat

Sore throat is one of the most common presenting symptoms in the general practice setting. The most common cause of sore throat is viral infection. Commonly implicated viruses include rhinovirus, coronavirus, adenovirus, influenza and parainfluenza viruses. The most...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest